Marisa Dipaola, USA / Portugal

Residency Period: August 1, 2016 - July 31, 2017


Bio

Marisa Dipaola was born barefoot on December 12th, 1977, and grew up in the cedar swamps and coastal Atlantic of southern New Jersey. She graduated with honors from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2000 where she majored in painting and began experimenting with site-specific sculptural installations. Upon graduation, Marisa received a travel grant to study la Mezquita, in Cordoba, Spain, which began a collection of travels to eighteen countries, studying the sacred architecture and natural wonders, producing site-specific artworks in Japan and Iceland as well as entire series of artwork while on residence in Spain, India, Italy, Egypt, Austria, and Bahrain.

She has exhibited her works internationally at museums, galleries, universities, cultural institutions, community gathering places, outdoors within natural sculptural parks and urban revitalization projects.

URL: dropr.com/marisadipaola


On-hiatus Proposal Summary

In the course of being a nomadic artist, Marisa Dipaola has wandered throughout the landscape in diverse surroundings, constantly inspired by the natural world that embraces us all. After residing in the southern Austrian Alps for three years, she and her family are ready for a road trip to move to southern Portugal, in order to buy and renovate an old farm as a sustainable, permaculture project: moonfarmers. Raising her three-year old daughter while this major project is on the go, she is unable to foresee any free-time to take part in the artworld, at least for a year or so. Instead, she will dedicate her time and artistic effort to turning an abandoned property into a sustainable small farm and retreat, and quite possibly a future artist residency.

Her time will be spent with rebuilding a sustainable habitation, sourcing and planting fruit and nut trees, native edibles, sacred seeds, establishing berry patches, grape vines, mushroom patches, a chicken coop, a small fish pond, a huge vegetable patch. She will use sculptural elements to create terraced farming areas, enhance microclimates and enable year-round cultivation courtesy of cold frames fashioned from old windows as well as illuminating indoor growing areas, a few wind-chimes, alternative-energy-generating works, and the interior redesign & redecoration of their living space. On a more scientific front, she hopes to incorporate the skills she learns during this time to create various sculptural projects that encourage growth, combining illuminated works with fungal works and garden projects to create sustainable, living artworks. Any additional free time she finds will be spent mending clothes from the pile she’s had gathering for years and to complete more butterfly carpets -- and there is that quilt she has wanted to make for her bedroom.

She hopes that the time working and reflecting while on-hiatus from the artworld, but proceeding with her moonfarmers project will guide the future, whichever way it grows.


Final Report


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recent comments

On Jul 31 2017, mathieu commented on revival: part IV: thank you for the reports and for the gorgeous photographs, your adventure is very inspiring![...]

On Jul 31 2017, co-director (s) commented on revival: part IV: I'm all choked up... July 31 happened to be my birthday too; what a last day! Thank you to you all!![...]

On Jul 31 2017, co-director (m) commented on revival: part IV: Thank you so much for your generous contribution to this project Marisa - and everyone (we know it's[...]

On Jul 30 2017, co-director (s) commented on revival: part three: One thing we regret not to have done sooner is to make the comment section capable of posting images[...]

On Jul 29 2017, marisa commented on revival: part one: Most of our gardening is playing the long-game & indeed for the patient-hearted. some of our tre[...]


farming for the moon

During this past Leaf time I harvested 

most of the arugula seed pods from the garden.
This is the largest cache of seeds I’ve ever grown,
and is inspiring me to allow more plants to grow seeds themselves
(& possibly join an online international seed-savers group for sustainable farmers).

The red leaf kale and yellow mustard seeds will be next to harvest,
followed by the French breakfast radishes, and then some coriander.
(& yes, since these are all somewhat related species, they might’ve crossbred;
but since they all have edible leaves, I’m not too worried.
The radishes were the last to bloom, while all the others
had already switched over to seed production,
so those radish seeds should be true.)

Otherwise, the orange, blood orange and tangerine tree have all blossomed.

As have the golden raspberries.


And in the garden, the stupice tomatoes have blossoms, too.

And during this most recent Fruit transplant time,
I transplanted ten more tomato seedlings into the garden
(four yellow pears, four ox-hearts, a green zebra & a purple Cherokee),
one organic Mexican mini-cucumber seedling near the garlic,
and five more organic sunflowers, which were planted and transplanted
during the Leo Fruit time to encourage harvestable seeds.

Outside the garden, in individual mounds,
I transplanted six watermelon seedlings,
three Calabacita seedlings (roundish zucchini relatives),
and four loofah squash seedlings
(an Egyptian heirloom that dry to become bathing sponges).

And on the hillside, we transplanted the pomegranate tree,
the hazelnut sapling, and the cutting from the fig tree near Marmalade’s school.
And we transplanted two lemon cucumber seedlings in the outdoor kitchen area
next to a bamboo cutting we “planted” into the ever-growing pergola.
And finally, I planted one of the rooted cuttings from the elderberry
that our Portuguese teacher had given us, in a molehill near the pond.
So thirty-five plantings in twenty-four hours, working until midnight,
with the songs of the nightingale to keep my thoughts company.

Needless to say, I’ve been taking a little break during these Root days,

to hang out with Marmalade (who really likes hanging out),

and work on training the kittens,
to finally get them to reliably use a sand-filled litter box.

And yet, I still found some time to weed the root sections of the garden,
harvest our first beets,

and mound mature compost around the potato plants.

And dig out the old compost bin, recomposting the top layers in the new pile,
while using the bottom mature compost for all these recent plantings.
The old wooden structure is already being reused
as the support for the transplanted loofahs,
with plans to grow chickpeas alongside them.

And Mohamed dug six more holes, to prepare for the upcoming Fruit time,
as I will be transplanting nine tomatillos, three strawberries,
six more Calabacitas, and three more lemon cucumbers,
with only a four hour window of planting time
during a Fruit trine Tuesday night.

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