Marisa Dipaola, USA / Portugal

Residency Period: August 1, 2016 - July 31, 2017


Bio

Marisa Dipaola was born barefoot on December 12th, 1977, and grew up in the cedar swamps and coastal Atlantic of southern New Jersey. She graduated with honors from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2000 where she majored in painting and began experimenting with site-specific sculptural installations. Upon graduation, Marisa received a travel grant to study la Mezquita, in Cordoba, Spain, which began a collection of travels to eighteen countries, studying the sacred architecture and natural wonders, producing site-specific artworks in Japan and Iceland as well as entire series of artwork while on residence in Spain, India, Italy, Egypt, Austria, and Bahrain.

She has exhibited her works internationally at museums, galleries, universities, cultural institutions, community gathering places, outdoors within natural sculptural parks and urban revitalization projects.

URL: dropr.com/marisadipaola


On-hiatus Proposal Summary

In the course of being a nomadic artist, Marisa Dipaola has wandered throughout the landscape in diverse surroundings, constantly inspired by the natural world that embraces us all. After residing in the southern Austrian Alps for three years, she and her family are ready for a road trip to move to southern Portugal, in order to buy and renovate an old farm as a sustainable, permaculture project: moonfarmers. Raising her three-year old daughter while this major project is on the go, she is unable to foresee any free-time to take part in the artworld, at least for a year or so. Instead, she will dedicate her time and artistic effort to turning an abandoned property into a sustainable small farm and retreat, and quite possibly a future artist residency.

Her time will be spent with rebuilding a sustainable habitation, sourcing and planting fruit and nut trees, native edibles, sacred seeds, establishing berry patches, grape vines, mushroom patches, a chicken coop, a small fish pond, a huge vegetable patch. She will use sculptural elements to create terraced farming areas, enhance microclimates and enable year-round cultivation courtesy of cold frames fashioned from old windows as well as illuminating indoor growing areas, a few wind-chimes, alternative-energy-generating works, and the interior redesign & redecoration of their living space. On a more scientific front, she hopes to incorporate the skills she learns during this time to create various sculptural projects that encourage growth, combining illuminated works with fungal works and garden projects to create sustainable, living artworks. Any additional free time she finds will be spent mending clothes from the pile she’s had gathering for years and to complete more butterfly carpets -- and there is that quilt she has wanted to make for her bedroom.

She hopes that the time working and reflecting while on-hiatus from the artworld, but proceeding with her moonfarmers project will guide the future, whichever way it grows.


Final Report


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recent comments

On Jul 31 2017, mathieu commented on revival: part IV: thank you for the reports and for the gorgeous photographs, your adventure is very inspiring![...]

On Jul 31 2017, co-director (s) commented on revival: part IV: I'm all choked up... July 31 happened to be my birthday too; what a last day! Thank you to you all!![...]

On Jul 31 2017, co-director (m) commented on revival: part IV: Thank you so much for your generous contribution to this project Marisa - and everyone (we know it's[...]

On Jul 30 2017, co-director (s) commented on revival: part three: One thing we regret not to have done sooner is to make the comment section capable of posting images[...]

On Jul 29 2017, marisa commented on revival: part one: Most of our gardening is playing the long-game & indeed for the patient-hearted. some of our tre[...]


getting warmer

We’ve been fortunate so far this winter with really mild weather.
Actually, I’m not sure that for here this is “mild” weather,
but sunny days in the mid-60’s (F, around 16-18 C)
is far nicer than we expected when we packed up to move here.
But our neighbors warned that this was predicted to be a really cold winter,
so we are trying to get prepared with firewood and such.

Mohamed came down with a cold earlier in the week,
probably from the drastic differences in temperature from day to night
(we get a healthy frosting each night, which melts by midmorning).
I caught his cold a few days later, and felt downright awful for a full day,
causing me to dig out our medicinal teas, herbal cough drops, and wear a scarf.
I became much more sensitive to the drafts in our house,
noticing that certain areas always felt cold and breezy,
even when the rest of the house was warm.

So we investigated our exterior walls more thoroughly,
and took note of several gaps and cracks and problem areas,
(that we saw before, back when our bathroom had been our top priority)
including three small sections of wall that were just filled with foam
(our wooden house is a composite of three garden houses,
and between them hollow walls, that were just stuffed with styrofoam).
So once we felt a little better, we filled the gaps,
put up some wooden panels along the roof line,
and a few tubes of silicon to seal all the cracks,
and go around several of our windows.
Then we used our extra pieces of cork siding
to male small sections to cover over the hollow walls,
creating cool little stripes of cork between the white wood of the garden houses.
Overall, much warmer,
especially in our bedroom!

Otherwise, we’ve been having a quiet holiday,
doing puzzles, reading books and watercolor painting with Marmalade,


watching our mole in action with its own home-improvement projects,

mole home improvement project
spending time in the garden, picking kale on Leaf day and radishes on Root day,


and cutting away more of the blackberries surrounding the ruin.

Yesterday I made it to the cornerstone,

finding cute little mushrooms had made it there before me,
and by this afternoon I could actually see inside to the “floor”.
Marmalade has been asking for relatives to come and visit her,
(as Skype is nice, but not the same as a real family visit)
so I’ve been working on the ruin so we have a place for everyone to stay,
hopefully by this Springtime.

While out in the garden,
a white passenger van drove by,
one that we’ve waved to often,
and often “beeps” in return.
They slowed down to a halt,
and shouted out the window
“Happy New Year!”

Yes, indeed.
Happy New Year!

Leave a Comment (2)

marisa wrote on Jan 5:

wow, they do!
they are Clavaria vermicularis, commonly known as worm-like coral fungus, and are edible, widespread and common, so perhaps the author was inspired by them as well. Funny, in the stories, they are silent wanderers,
yet we think of mushrooms are quite sedentary.
Though mushroom spores can survive space travel,
so perhaps they are as alien as they look!

co-director (s) wrote on Jan 4:

wow, those mushrooms totally look like hattifatteners in moomin!
https://www.moomin.com/en/characters/hattifatteners/